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D.C. Council Approves Paid Sick Leave Bill

Published by on March 5, 2008

The D.C. City Council approved the Accrued Sick and Safe Leave Act of 2008 yesterday that requires employers to provide their employees with paid sick leave, becoming the second city in the nation to do so.  The Washington Post has a story here.  The Mayor must still sign the bill, and Congress has 30 days to […]

The D.C. City Council approved the Accrued Sick and Safe Leave Act of 2008 yesterday that requires employers to provide their employees with paid sick leave, becoming the second city in the nation to do so.  The Washington Post has a story here.  The Mayor must still sign the bill, and Congress has 30 days to review it.  The Act will apply 6 months after such approval.

The text of the amended bill can be found here.  Here are some of the details:

  • The employee must have worked for the employer for 90 days.
  • Independent contractors and certain health care workers are excluded from coverage.
  • Employers with 100 or more employees must provide up to 7 paid sick leave days a year; employers with 25-99 employees must provide up to 5 paid sick leave days a year; employers with 24 or less employees must provide up to three paid sick leave days a year.  Eligibility is determined by hours worked.
  • Paid leave may be used for the employee’s illness or medical care, or to care for a child, parent, spouse or domestic partner, or for parental leave pursuant to the D.C. Parental Leave Act.  Leave may also be taken for certain situations connected with domestic violence, including court appearances.
  • Unused leave may carry over, but an employee may not actually use more than the annual amount provided in the statute.
  • Unused leave does not have to be paid out upon termination of employment.
  • The bill includes notification and medical certification provisions.
  • Employers may not discriminate against or discharge an employee for taking leave under the Act or engaging in other specific protected activities.
  • Employers must post a proscribed notice in the workplace regarding the Act.
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