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Recent Jury Verdicts and Settlements

Published by on February 22, 2011

Our latest update on recent jury verdicts and settlements after the break. PR – A mine operator in Puerto Rico reached a settlement with the Department of Labor in a retaliation suit involving a miner who alleged he was fired after participating in an investigation by the Mine Safety and Health Administration concerning safety issues […]

Our latest update on recent jury verdicts and settlements after the break.

PR – A mine operator in Puerto Rico reached a settlement with the Department of Labor in a retaliation suit involving a miner who alleged he was fired after participating in an investigation by the Mine Safety and Health Administration concerning safety issues at the mine.  As part of the settlement, the mine operator agreed to reinstate the miner to his former job and pay $6,000 in back wages, as well as a $15,000 civil penalty.

CT – The Department of Labor recovered $934,551 in overtime back wages for 479 UnitedHealthcare employees who were misclassified by the company as exempt from overtime pay requirements under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  The company was also fined $104,280 in civil penalties for the violations.

ME – A judge upheld a jury verdict awarding $7.3 million in emotional distress damages in a suit brought by a former client against a law firm alleging that the firm failed to defend his interests in a dispute with a family member over control of a business.

NJ – The Third Circuit affirmed the district court’s dismissal of a pro se plaintiff’s discrimination and hostile work environment claims alleging that she was discriminated against by her former employer because of her national origin, ethnicity, gender, age, and religion.

MI – A jury awarded $750,000 to a former Saginaw police officer who alleged he was fired for complaining of sexual harassment by his female supervisor.  The jury’s verdict included damages for mental and emotional distress but no economic damages.

Fifth Circuit – The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the district court’s grant of judgment as a matter of law in favor of the employer in a Title VII discrimination case.  The court held that the plaintiff had failed to establish a prima facie case because she could not show that her termination was racially motivated.

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