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Recent Jury Verdicts and Settlements

Published by on March 11, 2013

Our latest update on recent employment law jury verdicts and settlements after the break. FL – AutoCricket.com will pay $76,000 in back wages to 414 employees.  An investigation by the US Department of Labor found violations in minimum wages and overtime provisions.  The investigators discovered that the company deducted rest periods as non-work hours from […]

Our latest update on recent employment law jury verdicts and settlements after the break.

FL – AutoCricket.com will pay $76,000 in back wages to 414 employees.  An investigation by the US Department of Labor found violations in minimum wages and overtime provisions.  The investigators discovered that the company deducted rest periods as non-work hours from the total hours worked.  This failure to pay for break time resulted in workers being paid less than minimum wage.

CA – Casa Guadalupe, a grocery store chain, will pay $110,071 in overtime and back wages to 25 current and former employees.  The suit alleged that store violated labor law when it denied workers their overtime premium.

FL – National Council of La Raza Fund Inc. has been ordered to reinstate a whistle-blower who was fired for making a mold exposure complaint.  The employee will be paid back wages, interest, and compensatory and punitive damages.  The organization will also be required to expunge adverse information related to the incident from the employee’s personnel file.

NC – The North Carolina Court of Appeals has overturned a Goodyear Tire settlement payment of $450,000 to a worker in a harassment and retaliation claim.  The suit alleged that the worker was harassed by a supervisor based on her race, black, and gender.  The supervisor’s attacks left her feeling threatened and intimidated.  The suit also alleged that two black women were passed over for a management position which required a degree.  The position was given to a white male with only a high school diploma.  The court overturned the award based on a finding that the complainant brought her original case through the wrong venue.  The appeal court ruled the case should have been handled by the Industrial Commission, not the Cumberland County Superior Court.  The Cumberland court had awarded the money for retaliation, though it concluded no discrimination had occurred.

VA – A Norfolk realty company has settled a discrimination case for $82,500.  The suit alleged that the business refused to give a Hispanic woman her rental application because she isn’t fluent in English and refused translation assistance.  The company had a written policy requiring tenants to be able to communicate with management staff without assistance.

VA – The Virginia State Corporation Commission has settled a disability discrimination suit with a lawyer.  The suit alleged that the lawyer, who suffered from sleep apnea, was told he would be terminated or demoted due to his condition.  The SCC asked him to adjust his hours of attendance, which he did.  Still, they gave him a notice of termination for lack of sustainable improvement in his job performance.

NM – A jury has awarded a former Public Regulation Commission worker $960,000 under state whistle-blower law.  The suit alleged that the worker was fired for addressing problems with the state agency.  The case marks the first time a suit has been brought under New Mexico’s 2010 Whistleblower Protection Act.  The worker made complaints that his supervisors were hiring political contributors to investigate insurance cases.  The result was slow, costly, and ineffective investigations.

NY – A judge has upheld a sexual harassment verdict of $467,269 in punitive damages against an Oswego grocery store.  The suit was brought on behalf of ten women complainants, most of who were teen-agers when the harassment took place.  The original award was $1.25 million to the class of workers.

USA – The information service company kgb USA will pay $1.3 million in unpaid minimum wage and overtime wages to 14,500 of its “Special Agents.”  The company has settled an independent contractor misclassification claim with the U.S. Department of Labor by labeling the workers as independent contractors instead of employees.

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