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California Makes Space For Women On The Board

Published on November 26, 2018

California makes space for women to have a seat at the table in first state law requiring all publicly traded companies in the state to have at least one female on their board of directors by the end of 2019.

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Virginia Tightens Enforcement Pertaining to Employee Misclassification

Published on October 20, 2015

As the repercussions of the California Labor Commission’s June 2015 ruling in Uber v. Berwick that an Uber driver was an employee and not an independent contractor continue to unfold, state legislatures and agencies are continuing to drive a renewed enforcement focus against employers who rely on independent contractor classification for personnel who likely should be treated as employees. (more…) ...

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U.S. Department of Labor Expands State-Level Partnerships to Enforce Employee Classification Standards

Published on September 18, 2015

On August 13, 2015, the U.S. Department of Labor announced the formal signing of a three-year Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOL and the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development for the purposes of sharing information and coordinating law enforcement activities to pursue actions against employers for employee misclassification. ...

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Latest FLSA and EEOC Changes Drive Dramatic Shifts in Overtime, Classification and Discrimination

Published on September 10, 2015

The summer of 2015 continues to be a busy time for federal agencies with responsibility for regulating employment matters. The Department of Labor (DOL) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued new interpretations of key employment principles that are currently receiving significant scrutiny in both the judicial and political realms.

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California’s Uber Decision Deepens the Employee vs. Independent Contractor Debate in Emerging Industries

Published on June 18, 2015

On June 3, 2015, the California Labor Commission found that a driver for the wildly popular ride-hailing service Uber was in fact operating as an employee, and not as an independent contractor, making her eligible for reimbursement of work expenses and other costs required of employers. The driver filed an initial complaint with the California Labor Commission in September 2014.

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